Going Global

This course focuses on several essential questions related to a company’s efforts to succeed in the global marketplace: What is the value of “going global”? What organizational structures best contribute to global success? And how can a company evaluate the strength of the economy in a country location to ensure wise decisions about potential expansions?

Faculty

Prof. Carol Scott

Prof. Carol Scott

Professor

Carol A. Scott is a professor of marketing and faculty director for the Executive Program at The John E. Anderson Graduate School of Management at the University of California, Los Angeles. She has taught in the Executive MBA program since its inception in 1982 and was on the faculty of The Ohio State University for three years prior to joining UCLA in 1977.

She was named the outstanding teacher at The Anderson School for the 1983-84 year by the MBA student body. From 1986 through 1994 she served the School in a variety of administrative positions and in 1985 was a visiting associate professor at the Harvard Business School.

Professor Scott’s research interests include marketing positioning strategies and customer analysis for marketing decisions. Her work has been published in marketing and social science journals, and she has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Consumer Research, the Journal of Marketing Research, and the Journal of Marketing.

She has served as a consultant to a variety of profit and non-profit organizations on questions of marketing strategy, market positioning, and marketing effectiveness, and she often serves as an expert witness in litigation involving marketing questions. She was a member of the board of directors for Sizzler International, Inc. for six years, and presently serves on the board of United Online, Inc., the parent of Netzero, Juno, Classmates, and MyPoints.

Education

Ph.D. Marketing, 1975, Northwestern University
M.S. Management, 1972, Northwestern University
B.S. Education, 1970, University of Texas at Austin

Interests

Aerospace, Consumer Behavior, Corporate Renewal, Customer Analysis, Global Marketing, Marketing Strategy, Medical Marketing, Retailing, Trademarks, Marketing Trends

Prof. Gonzalo Freixes

Prof. Gonzalo Freixes

Professor

Gonzalo Freixes is a senior lecturer in the accounting area and is currently the Associate Dean of the Executive MBA and Fully Employed MBA programs, as wells as overseeing the Global Immersion programs for all three UCLA Anderson MBA programs. Mr. Freixes also serves as faculty director for the Applied Management Research Program for the full-time MBA Program. He holds a doctorate in jurisprudence from Loyola Law School and a master’s in business taxation from the University of Southern California.

Mr. Freixes teaches business law, international business law, business ethics, corporate and individual taxation, and real estate law & taxation in the MBA Program and in the undergraduate accounting minor program. He has lectured in Brazil, Spain, France, Holland, Argentina, South Africa, Belgium and Chile on international business & tax subjects. Previously, he taught international business law and business law at California State University, Northridge.

Mr. Freixes also directs the Price Center’s UCLA Summer Entrepreneurship Institute for undergraduate students, where he also teaches a course in business ethics and corporate governance. He frequently lectures in the subjects of taxation, corporate governance, business ethics, international business law, and trial advocacy.

In 2011, Mr. Freixes received the Neidorf Decade Teaching Award from the UCLA Anderson faculty and in 2006, he received the Fully Employed MBA class Outstanding Teacher Award. He is the faculty advisor and coach for the UCLA Mock Trial program. UCLA won the national mock trial championship in 2004, 2005, and 2011. He also served as a writer and consultant for the pilot of a Fox TV reality series, The Partner.

Mr. Freixes currently serves on the Board of Trustees of the Executive MBA Council and was Chair of the Board in 2012. He was an elected official with the Newhall School Board of Trustees (serving two years as its president) and also served on the State Bar of California’s Judicial Nominees Commission for three years, where he evaluated the California governor’s judicial nominees for the Supreme, Appellate, Superior and Municipal Courts.

Education

J.D. Law, 1979, Loyola Law School
M.A. Business Taxation, 2008, USC

Interests

Business law, taxation, business ethics, governance, international law and taxation, international trade, Latin America, law, political and legal strategy, start-up companies

Prof. Sanjay Sood

Prof. Sanjay Sood

Professor

Sanjay Sood’s research and teaching expertise lies in the area of brand equity and consumer decision making. Using psychological principles, Sanjay examines how firms can best build, manage, and leverage strong brand names. This includes investigating what brand names mean to consumers, how to manage brand portfolios, how to use brand naming strategies to launch new products, and how to protect brand names from becoming diluted over time and across geographical boundaries. His research has been published in leading marketing and psychology journals including the Journal of Consumer ResearchJournal of Marketing, and Cognitive Psychology.

Dr. Sood is an associate editor at the Journal of Marketing, and he is on the editorial review boards of the Journal of Consumer ResearchJournal of Consumer Psychology and the Journal of Marketing Research.

Dr. Sood obtained his PhD in marketing from the Graduate School of Business, Stanford University. His MBA degree is from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management, Northwestern University, in marketing and strategy. He gained industry experience in product marketing at Centel Corporation, now a division of Sprint. Before joining Centel, he completed a BS degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Dr. Sood has won several awards for excellence in teaching and student mentoring, including the Neidorf Decade Teaching Award at UCLA. Actively involved with industry, Sanjay has worked with several leading marketing companies, including Intel, Starbucks, Disney, Levi-Strauss, Microsoft, and Kaiser Permanente.

Education

Ph.D. in marketing, Graduate School of Business, 1999, Stanford University
M.B.A. in marketing and strategy, Kellogg Graduate School of Management, 1992, Northwestern University
B.S. in electrical engineering with honors, 1987, University of Illinois

Interests

Marketing management, brand management, advertising, consumer behavior

Course Learning Objectives:

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Identify common challenges and likely opportunities connected with a domestic organization’s entering the global market.
  • Analyze a set of circumstances to recommend the most advantageous organizational structure for a given globalizing company.
  • Develop a set of guidelines to address one of the five challenge areas – resources, talent, innovation, risk, and commitment – for a company that is in the process of globalizing its business.
  • Use the PEST structure to analyze a potential new foreign market.
  • Consider the facts related to a proposed new foreign market to recommend the best method for initial entry.
  • From a list, select final candidates for positions as business manager, country manager, and human resources functional manager for a new branch office in a new market, providing rationales for each choice.
  • Prepare for a negotiation, including determining aspiration/target point, reservation point, BATNA, and first offer.
  • Estimate the aspiration/target point, reservation point, BATNA, and first offer of a negotiating counterpart and compare them with your own.
  • Write a rationale for making the first offer in a negotiation, supporting your position with psychological reasons.
  • Analyze a specific interest to generate a list of possible positions that could satisfy the negotiator’s needs.
  • Examine a stalled negotiation between members of different cultures to develop recommendations for restarting the discussion and moving it in a positive direction.
  • Analyze an existing brand to identify its brand promise; its products, as distinct from the attributes of its brand; and the responses that allow its customers to make an emotional connection with the brand.
  • For a new brand, create a statement of brand meaning, a statement of brand positioning, and a brand mantra.
  • Analyze a statement of brand meaning, brand positioning, and brand mantra to determine its brand ideal and associated fundamental human value.
  • Apply lessons about branding drawn from Apple to a developing brand.
  • Propose choices for each element of the marketing mix — product, place, price, and promotion – that reflect a brand’s stated message, or mantra.
  • Create and rank-order a list of five potential brand extensions, based on a core product, providing a rationale for the ranking.

Syllabus

Globalization 

Learning Objectives:

As a result of participating in this module, you will be able to:

  • Identify common challenges and likely opportunities connected with a domestic organization’s entering the global market.
  • Analyze a set of circumstances to recommend the most advantageous organizational structure for a given globalizing company.
  • Develop a set of guidelines to address one of the five challenge areas – resources, talent, innovation, risk, and commitment – for a company that is in the process of globalizing its business.

Module Components:

Video Lectures:

  • Going Global – Considerations
  • Organizaing a Global Company
  • Addressing the Challenges in Global Expansion

Readings:

  • International Business Expansion
  • Taking Your Business Global (Part 1)
  • Taking Your Business Global (Part 2)
  • Global Marketing Mix – Product and Promotion
  • Global Marketing Mix – Placement
  • Global Marketing Mix – Price

Case Study:

  • Case Study: FreeForAll Healthy Snacks

Quiz:

  • Globalization

Going from Local to Global

Learning Objectives:

As a result of participating in this module, you will be able to:

  • Use the PEST structure to analyze a potential new foreign market.
  • Consider the facts related to a proposed new foreign market to recommend the best method for initial entry.
  • From a list, select final candidates for positions as business manager, country manager, and human resources functional manager for a new branch office in a new market, providing rationales for each choice.

Module Components:

Video Lectures:

  • Challenges and Issues in Going Global
  • Practicalities and Perspectives for Global Market Entry
  • Capabilities and Competencies of the Global Manager

Readings:

  • Entering an Emerging Foreign Market
  • Succeed in International Markets
  • The Case of Greek Banks Entering the Albanian Market

Case Study:

  • Marrilae as a Future Global Leader 

Quiz:

  • Going from Local to Global

The Art of Negotiation

Learning Objectives:

As a result of participating in this module, you will be able to:

  • Prepare for a negotiation, including determining aspiration/target point, reservation point, BATNA, and first offer.
  • Estimate the aspiration/target point, reservation point, BATNA, and first offer of a negotiating counterpart and compare them with your own.
  • Write a rationale for making the first offer in a negotiation, supporting your position with psychological reasons.

Module Components:

Video Lectures:

  • Understanding the art of Negotiation
  • Real-World Examples from Negotiations
  • The Psychology of First Offers

Readings:

  • The Art of Negotiating
  • Basic Negotiating Tips Anyone Can Use
  • Negotiation Tips for Beginners
  • Ten Tips for Negotiating by Ed Brodow
  • Five Things You Should Never Say While Negotiating

Case Study:

  • Case Study: Marrilae as a Future Global Leader 

Quiz:

  • The Art of Negotiation

Global and Cross Cultural Negotiation

Learning Objectives:

As a result of participating in this module, you will be able to:

  • Analyze a specific interest to generate a list of possible positions that could satisfy the negotiator’s needs.
  • Examine a stalled negotiation between members of different cultures to develop recommendations for restarting the discussion and moving it in a positive direction.

Module Components:

Video Lectures:

  • Building and Managing Positions and Interests
  • Cross-Cultural Negotiations

Readings:

  • Cross-Cultural Communication and Negotiation
  • Mapping Cultures-Strategies for Effective Intercultural Negotiations

Case Study:

  • Case Study: Marrilae as a Future Global Leader 

Quiz:

  • Global and Cross Cultural Negotiation

Developing a Global Branding Strategy

Learning Objectives:

As a result of participating in this module, you will be able to:

  • Analyze an existing brand to identify its brand promise; its products, as distinct from the attributes of its brand; and the responses that allow its customers to make an emotional connection with the brand.
  • For a new brand, create a statement of brand meaning, a statement of brand positioning, and a brand mantra.
  • Analyze a statement of brand meaning, brand positioning, and brand mantra to determine its brand ideal and associated fundamental human value.

Module Components:

Video Lectures:

  • Building a Global Brand
  • Conducting thorough Brand Analysis
  • Creating Lasting Brand Ideals

Readings:

  • Three Steps to Creating Your Branding Message
  • Impactful Branding Strategies
  • Defining a Brand

Case Study:

  • Simpler Shoes

Quiz:

  • Developing a Global Branding Strategy

Implementing a Global Branding Strategy

Learning Objectives:

As a result of participating in this module, you will be able to:

  • Apply lessons about branding drawn from Apple to a developing brand.
  • Propose choices for each element of the marketing mix — product, place, price, and promotion – that reflect a brand’s stated message, or mantra.
  • Create and rank-order a list of five potential brand extensions, based on a core product, providing a rationale for the ranking.

Module Components:

Video Lectures:

  • Building a Strong Brand – an Example
  • Brand Building through the Marketing Mix
  • Developing Successful Brand Extensions

Readings:

  • Developing Brands and Brand Lines
  • Creating a loved brand by telling a story: Tether
  • The Role of Market Related Variables

Case Study:

  • Simpler Shoes 

Quiz:

  • Implementing a Global Branding Strategy

Support

Please email support@northwest.academy for any support required with respect to the program, course or platform.